Shoutout to the Entrepeneurs and Businesses

In this new day and age, businesses take a proactive approach in being environmentally friendly. What this does is enforce the moral standards of a corporation and ultimately boosts sales. Consumers now demand that businesses take this approach.

This blog is dedicated to the businesses that try to make our world a greener place. Also, to the artists who inspire innovation and creativity in this place we call Earth. There is no limitation to the uses of these ideas once the reader grasps the concepts posted. With a sturdy foundation, one can eventually draw insight from the internal and materialize to the external. Combining elements of art and environmentally friendly practices are vital as well.

How to Make a Crochet Monster Hat

I started by following Alli Crafts Earflap Hat pattern. This is one of my go-to patterns because it works up quickly and ranges from preemie-toddler sizes. The blue hat is toddler size and the green hat is 9-12 month size. I left off the earflaps on the blue toddler hat and ended with two rows of red. One thing I always change when following her directions is instead of chaining 3 at the beginning of each round, I chain 2 (do not count it as a dc), start my round in the same stitch as my ch 2 and then join my round to the first dc. It hides the seam much better this way. For the spikes and the eye I followed The Boy Trifecta’s Monster Hat Pattern. For the eye I added in a 3rd color and made it larger. And the spikes I made shorter. The mouth is just a series of chains. Just stop at desired length. And the Tooth pattern is as follows: Chain 6. Sl st into second chain from hook then sc, hdc, dc, dc. Fasten off leaving long tail to sew on. I hope you were able to follow all of that. Let me know if you have any questions!

How to Make a Crochet Monster Hat

I started by following Alli Crafts Earflap Hat pattern. This is one of my go-to patterns because it works up quickly and ranges from preemie-toddler sizes. The blue hat is toddler size and the green hat is 9-12 month size. I left off the earflaps on the blue toddler hat and ended with two rows of red. One thing I always change when following her directions is instead of chaining 3 at the beginning of each round, I chain 2 (do not count it as a dc), start my round in the same stitch as my ch 2 and then join my round to the first dc. It hides the seam much better this way.

For the spikes and the eye I followed The Boy Trifecta’s Monster Hat Pattern. For the eye I added in a 3rd color and made it larger. And the spikes I made shorter.

The mouth is just a series of chains. Just stop at desired length.

And the Tooth pattern is as follows:
Chain 6.
Sl st into second chain from hook then sc, hdc, dc, dc.
Fasten off leaving long tail to sew on.

I hope you were able to follow all of that. Let me know if you have any questions!

Tags: DIY Crafts

How to Make a Rainbow Art Scrapbook

(Source: blog.craftzine.com)

DIY: Papercut Lamp

(Source: blog.craftzine.com)

Pebble Paintings
It’s a blast from the past with ’70s-style rock art that combines color, shape and texture. Cathie Filian and Steve Piacenza are full of crafty ideas guaranteed to rock your world! Planet Earth is the inspiration for amazing pebble paintings, stepping stones receive a personal touch, and paperweights and lucky bamboo bring a Zen presence to any desk. Materials and Tools:
1/4” thick plywood (cut to desired size)3/4” thick molding (enough to go around the plywood)sawmiter boxwood puttyputty knifewood embroidery hoops (different sizes to fit the design) small aquarium pebbles (different colors)natural pebblesE6000 gluelarge amount of Mod-Podge or other découpage mediumcraft paintpaintbrushesfinishing nails and hammerpicture hanger
Steps:
1. Using a saw and miter box, cut mitered edges into the molding to create a frame for the plywood. Attach the molding to the outside edges of the plywood with finishing nails.
2. Fill any gaps between the plywood and the frame with wood putty. Next, apply a small amount of putty around the perimeter of the plywood where it meets the molding frame and let dry.
3. Paint the frame and plywood interior a color that will match the rocks. Based on the design pattern, paint each of the inside hoops with craft paint and let dry.
4. Place the hoops on the plywood according to the pattern and glue in place. If desired, cut the hoops apart, remove a section and place the hoops in an interlocking pattern with another hoop.
5. Fill the hoops with colored aquarium rocks. Fill the remainder of the plywood base with natural pebbles.
6. Pour découpage medium over the surface of the artwork. Brush the medium evenly over the frame to create a uniform sheen.
7. Let the découpage medium dry flat for 2 weeks. Attach a picture hanger to the back to hang or use flat as table decor. If hanging on the wall, use an anchor to support the weight.

Pebble Paintings

It’s a blast from the past with ’70s-style rock art that combines color, shape and texture. Cathie Filian and Steve Piacenza are full of crafty ideas guaranteed to rock your world! Planet Earth is the inspiration for amazing pebble paintings, stepping stones receive a personal touch, and paperweights and lucky bamboo bring a Zen presence to any desk.

Materials and Tools:

1/4” thick plywood (cut to desired size)
3/4” thick molding (enough to go around the plywood)
saw
miter box
wood putty
putty knife
wood embroidery hoops (different sizes to fit the design)
small aquarium pebbles (different colors)
natural pebbles
E6000 glue
large amount of Mod-Podge or other découpage medium
craft paint
paintbrushes
finishing nails and hammer
picture hanger

Steps:

1. Using a saw and miter box, cut mitered edges into the molding to create a frame for the plywood. Attach the molding to the outside edges of the plywood with finishing nails.

2. Fill any gaps between the plywood and the frame with wood putty. Next, apply a small amount of putty around the perimeter of the plywood where it meets the molding frame and let dry.

3. Paint the frame and plywood interior a color that will match the rocks. Based on the design pattern, paint each of the inside hoops with craft paint and let dry.

4. Place the hoops on the plywood according to the pattern and glue in place. If desired, cut the hoops apart, remove a section and place the hoops in an interlocking pattern with another hoop.

5. Fill the hoops with colored aquarium rocks. Fill the remainder of the plywood base with natural pebbles.

6. Pour découpage medium over the surface of the artwork. Brush the medium evenly over the frame to create a uniform sheen.

7. Let the découpage medium dry flat for 2 weeks. Attach a picture hanger to the back to hang or use flat as table decor. If hanging on the wall, use an anchor to support the weight.

Tags: DIY Crafts

How to Make Recycled Planters

Materials and Tools:
new paint cansawlhammergravelpotting soilplants
Note: Always use new paint cans for this project. They’re inexpensive and, unlike used cans, you don’t have to worry about paint residue on the inside harming your plants.
Turn the paint can upside down and punch some drainage holes in the bottom with an awl.
With the can right side up, decorate the outside by dribbling paint down from the lip of the can. Use whatever colors you like; you can use a toothpick or wooden skewer to spread the paint down the side of the can, mixing colors as you go.
Once the paint is dry, put a layer of gravel in the bottom of the can. Add your potting soil and plants. Michele Beschen recommends watering plantings in metal containers like these daily because metal containers retain more heat than those made of other materials.

How to Make Recycled Planters


Materials and Tools:

new paint cans
awl
hammer
gravel
potting soil
plants

Note: Always use new paint cans for this project. They’re inexpensive and, unlike used cans, you don’t have to worry about paint residue on the inside harming your plants.

  1. Turn the paint can upside down and punch some drainage holes in the bottom with an awl.
  2. With the can right side up, decorate the outside by dribbling paint down from the lip of the can. Use whatever colors you like; you can use a toothpick or wooden skewer to spread the paint down the side of the can, mixing colors as you go.
  3. Once the paint is dry, put a layer of gravel in the bottom of the can. Add your potting soil and plants. Michele Beschen recommends watering plantings in metal containers like these daily because metal containers retain more heat than those made of other materials.

Tags: DIY Crafts

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That which I cannot remember

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